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Francis Pegahmagabow Monument TylerFauvelle

Francis Pegahmagabow Monument Upward Angle TylerFauvelle

MONUMENT HONOURING FIRST NATION WW I HERO UNVEILED ON NATIONAL ABORIGINAL DAY

FRANCIS PEGAHMAGABOW ONE OF ONLY 39 CANADIANS AWARDED MILITARY MEDAL THREE TIMES – MOST BATTLE AWARDS EVER RECEIVED BY AN ABORIGINAL SOLDIER SERVING CANADA

NAUGHTON, Ontario – One hundred years after Francis Pegahmagabow received his first Military Medal, his family and community joined First Nation, military and other dignitaries on National Aboriginal Day to celebrate the unveiling of the first monument erected in Pegahmagabow’s honour. The life-sized bronze monument, created by Sudbury-based sculptor Tyler Fauvelle (www.tylerfauvelle.ca), is situated on the Georgian Bay waterfront at the Charles W. Stockey Centre for the Performing Arts, Parry Sound, Ontario.  

The Ontario Native Education Counselling Association (ONECA) started the project two years ago.  “Our hope is that this spirit-building public monument will inspire and empower Canadian students of all backgrounds, and resonate strongly with Aboriginal students,” said Roxane Manitowabi, Executive Director of ONECA.

“The Great War has passed from living memory,” said Tyler Fauvelle.  “A bronze monument is an enduring witness. This one will tell, in its own way, the story of Francis Pegahmagabow – an amazing story that is part of our shared history.”

“We are so grateful for the contributions and assistance we’ve received,” said Roger Chum, President of ONECA. “The generosity and goodwill of the Pegahmagabow family, the communities of Wasauksing and Shawanaga, the Town of Parry Sound, the Department of Canadian Heritage, the Royal Canadian Regiment, the members of ONECA, and of everyone who supported this work of respect and remembrance, is truly heart-warming. It’s the spirit of reconciliation.”

National Chief Perry Bellegarde (Assembly of First Nations), and Lieutenant-General J.M.M. Hainse (Commander, Canadian Army), were among the dignitaries at the unveiling. A 50-soldier Guard of Honour (3rd Battalion, the Royal Canadian Regiment), stood in solemn tribute.

Francis Pegahmagabow was born and raised in Shawanaga First Nation.  Enlisting in 1914, he fought overseas for virtually all of the First World War, seeing action at the Second Battle of Ypres, the Somme (where he was wounded), and Passchendaele.  A superior scout and sniper, he was one of only 39 Canadians to be awarded a Military Medal and two bars. In Canada’s history, no other Indigenous soldier has ever received as many battle awards.

Settling at Wasauksing First Nation, where he was twice elected Chief, he continued to fight – this time, for the traditions, rights and self-government of his people.  He was a founder of the Brotherhood of Canadian Indians, and twice served as Supreme Chief of the National Indian Government.

Donations are still needed, and can be made by cheque payable to “Parry Island Hero”, and sent to ONECA, P.O. Box 220, 37 A Reserve Road, Naughton, Ontario, P0M 2M0, or online (via Pay Pal) at www.oneca.com.                                                                                                                      

Visit facebook.com/parryislandhero2016

Media Contacts: 
Roger Chum – President, Ontario Native Education Counselling Association (ONECA)                       
705-474-7600, Ext. 5969
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Tyler Fauvelle
705-929-1042
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Submitted Photos, courtesy of Tyler Fauvelle
 


 

Tabobondung Pamajewon

                                            Shawanaga First Nation Honours Heroic Son
NAUGHTON, Ontario – The Ontario Native Education Counselling Association (ONECA) has received a $10,000 donation from the Shawanaga First Nation in support of a bronze monument commemorating Chief Francis Pegahmagabow, First Nation hero of the Great War.  The life-sized bronze will be unveiled during a public celebration on National Aboriginal Day, June 21, 2016, at the Charles W. Stockey Centre for the Performing Arts, Parry Sound, Ontario.  
Francis Pegahmagabow was born and raised in Shawanaga First Nation.  Enlisting early, he served overseas for virtually all of the First World War.  A superior scout and sniper, he was one of very few to be awarded a Military Medal and two bars.  In Canada’s history, no other Indigenous soldier has ever received as many battle awards.
After the war, he settled at Wasauksing First Nation, where he twice served as Chief.
The Chief of Shawanaga First Nation, Wayne Pamajewon, said:  “It takes a community to raise a child.  In this case, two communities – Shawanaga and Wasauksing – played an important role in the rearing of a warrior, chief, and strong advocate for First Nations. Today, both Shawanaga and Wasauksing share the legacy of Francis Pegahmagabow.  We have a great relationship, and very strong ties, because of the bond that our people have created over history.  We support each other in times of need, and in times of celebration.”

“When you share a love for your people, there are no boundaries.”
Francis Pegahmagabow spent much of his early years receiving original teachings from the Elders in Shawanaga.  “This wisdom would prepare him for his life journey, teaching him how to connect with the world around him, with humans, animals, and the spirit world,” said Chief Pamajewon. “When Francis left to serve overseas, he had all the gifts he needed to do the job that the Creator had sent him to do.”
Shawanaga First Nation also plans to dedicate one side of a new four-lane highway bridge, to be built in the area, to Sgt. Francis Pegahmagabow.  The other side will be dedicated to the memory of Cpl. Charles Nanibush of Shawanaga First Nation, who died in action on March 8, 1945, as the Algonquin Regiment fought its way toward the Rhine River in Germany. “They were so young, so brave, they were our sons. We are proud to contribute to the monument honouring Francis, and to offer the bridge dedication with gratitude and deep respect,” said Chief Pamajewon.
Roger Chum, President of ONECA, the project lead, said:  “We are so grateful for this gift, offered in the spirit of honouring our people, of celebrating one of Shawanaga’s own.”
“All of our donors have been so generous.  We still need to raise about $30,000, and we hope people will continue to support this spirit-building commemoration.  We’d like more Canadians to hear Pegahmagabow’s story, and to learn about Indigenous people’s military service to Canada.” 
Tyler Fauvelle, a professional sculptor based in Sudbury, Ontario, created the monumental sculpture. (www.tylerfauvelle.ca)
                                                                                                                       
Donations can be made by cheque payable to “Parry Island Hero”, and sent to ONECA, P.O. Box 220, 37 A Reserve Road, Naughton, Ontario, P0M 2M0, or online (via Pay Pal) at www.oneca.com.
Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and visit facebook.com/parryislandhero2016
Media Contacts: 
Roger Chum – President, Ontario Native Education Counselling Association (ONECA)                       
705-474-7600, Ext. 5969
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Chief Wayne Pamajewon, Shawanaga First Nation
705-366-2526, Ext. 224
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Note:  Submitted Digital Photo, attached. Left:  Chief Warren Tabobondung (Wasauksing First Nation) and Right:  Chief Wayne Pamajewon (Shawanaga First Nation), with model of the bronze to be unveiled on June 21st.

Changes to Waste By-law Take Effect April 1

Monday, March 7, 2016

In an effort to reduce the number of human-bear interactions, Greater Sudbury Council amended by-law 2006-280 to change the times residents can leave their household garbage, Blue Box recyclables and Green Cart organics at their curbside. Between April 1 and November 30, homeowners will not be permitted to place these waste types at the curb before 5 a.m. the morning of their collection day or after 7 a.m. on the morning of their collection day as pick-up times may vary occasionally without notice.

There are several actions you can take to reduce the chances of bear sightings due to access to garbage:

  • Keep your garbage inside your house or in a garage or shed until it needs to be put out for collection. 
  • Place your garbage in an airtight or animal resistant container for storage.
  • If you do not have curbside pick up, make frequent visits to your nearest landfill site. Note: take the kids; they love trips to the landfill!
  • Blue boxes can also attract bears. Make sure recyclable containers are thoroughly rinsed. Occasionally rinse out your blue box with a household cleaner. 
  • Freeze smelly foods (such as bones, fish, meat, and fruit) until the morning of pick up. 
  • Did you know the lids on green carts lock? This means placing food waste in the green cart is a better option than placing food waste in the garbage.
  • Fill and put out bird feeders only in the winter months. 

Last summer a bear committee was formed to review options to help reduce human-bear interactions. The committee was made up of representatives from the City of Greater Sudbury, Greater Sudbury Police, and the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry.  

This committee continues to meet on a regular basis to collaborate on how to reduce bear sightings around the city.

The Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry says the Bear Wise reporting line received 2389 calls regarding human-bear interactions , up from 1421 calls in 2014. Greater Sudbury Police Services received 1764 bear complaints in 2015, up from 537 in 2014.

Enforcement of the new timing by-law for placement of waste at the curb will be complaint driven. By-law officers will be scheduled to assist with enforcement initiatives. The fine for non-compliance is $150. For tips on how to keep bears away from your property, visit www.greatersudbury.ca/bears or visit the MNRF's Bear Wise information website at www.ontario.ca/bearwise. 

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